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Campgrounds busy during pandemic

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OXFORD, Iowa (KCRG) -With most of the normal summer activities shut down, campgrounds are seeing more business during the pandemic. Sleepy Hollow RV Park and Campground has been busier than usual this summer, and partial-owner Alidalee Gingerich says the biggest difference is an increase in visitors during the week. They’ve also had to put in place a wait-list every weekend-a measure usually only needed on holiday weekends.

Troy Nuemann and his family come to Sleepy Hollow Campground every summer.

He says it’s been a lot busier than usual, and that it’s full of people looking for a socially-distanced summer activity. “Lot of nothing going on, so they find other places to go. So, I think more people come here to spend their time, and it’s a nice family environment, everyone’s a family here,” says Nuemann.

Gingerich says people are camping as a substitute for plans they had to cancel because of COVID-19, like honeymoons, vacations, or summer camps.

Sleepy Hollow sees a lot of local campers that come every year…but this summer Gingerich has noticed more new faces. “With everything going on this year it’s good for them to get out and getaway and camping is really in a sense one of the few things that you still can do. And they’ve been enjoying it and they’ve been coming,” says Gingerich.

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Sentencing delay | News | purcellregister.com

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For the second time this year, sentencing for the former co-owner of the now defunct Sooner RV has been delayed because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Regina K. Clark, 53, of Euliss, Texas, pleaded guilty February 18 in McClain County District Court to four counts of assault with a dangerous weapon, one count of second degree burglary and 13 counts of embezzlement.

Sentencing was first set for April 23. But that was pushed back to July 28 due to COVID-19-related issues.

The continuing pandemic prompted a second delay and sentencing is now scheduled for 1 p.m. September 1. 

On Dec. 17, 2014, Clark chased her then-husband Brett Clark and three employees including her son and daughter-in-law with a stolen .357 revolver, firing several shots at them.

Clark stole the revolver, as well as an AR-15 rifle, from the home of a Sooner RV customer.

She had been served with divorce papers the day before the shooting, according to court documents.

Eleven of the embezzlement victims told officials Clark sold their RV’s on consignment, but they never received any money from the sales. Two others paid Clark for extended warranties, but she used their money for other things.

Court documents put the total financial loss to the victims at $359,745.

Each of the assault charges is punishable by up to 10 years in prison and/or a $10,000 fine. Maximum penalty on the burglary charge is 7 years and/or a $10,000 fine.

The embezzlement counts are punishable by up to 2, 5 or 8 years and/or fines up to $5,000 or $10,000.

A pre-sentence investigation prepared before the scheduled  April sentencing concluded probation “does not appear to be a sufficient deterrent” and recommended she serve a prison term.

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Jesse Eisenberg explains how anxiety, RV skills have made him an unlikely pandemic survivalist

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Jesse Eisenberg, Jimmy Fallon

Jesse Eisenberg, Jimmy Fallon
Screenshot: The Tonight Show

Jesse Eisenberg, like most of Hollywood (and not-Hollywood) doesn’t have much going on right now. Explaining to Jimmy Fallon on Tuesday’s Tonight Show that he and his family embarked on a cross-country road trip once the pandemic hit Los Angeles, Eisenberg painted the perhaps incongruous picture of The End Of The Tour star behind the wheel of a big-ass recreational vehicle all the way back home to Indiana. Calling his choice of family conveyance the safest, most pandemic-responsible way to bring everyone straight through the middle of America, Eisenberg also shared pictures he took of his rented camper van alone on the grounds of a museum and told Fallon about being the only family at the entire Grand Canyon. Which sounds sort of cool, if you discount the whole Zombieland/The Last Man On Earth vibe.

Still, as Eisenberg said, he’s been able to weather the isolation and fear of living in a country glancing askance at every stray gust of possibly contaminated wind thanks to his finally useful superpower—crippling lifelong anxiety. “Anytime there’s a real crisis in the world, I’m like kind of an American hero,” joked-not joked Eisenberg, saying, “I’ve been anxiety-free ever since the pandemic struck.” Eisenberg, who’s always been forthright about his struggles with anxiety and depression, boasted that those among us who walk around “364 days a year American coward” are the only ones fully prepared for a world where even a trip to the grocery store is as life-or-death stressful as dodging zombies in a post-apocalyptic wasteland. “When something happens,” we’re the only ones that are ready for it,” stated Eisenberg of himself and his similarly anxious peers.

Along those lines, Eisenberg also told Fallon about his pandemic project, the optimistically titled Audible audio drama When You Finish Saving The World. Written by and co-starring Eisenberg (plus Stranger Things’ Finn Wolfhard and Booksmart’s Kaitlyn Dever), the produceable-in-responsible-isolation audio drama follows the three members of a family through various times in their individual lives as they ruminate upon how they got where they are. Eisenberg told Fallon that indie distributors A24 have already picked up his audio novel for a film adaptation, to be directed by Eisenberg and starring Julianne Moore in the relatively virus-scarce air of Manitoba. And while Eisenberg’s newfound RV skills will no doubt serve him well heading into the Canadian wilds, he did say that the responsibility of putting something out under A24’s nigh-impeccable imprimatur has filled him with some of that old, familiar dread. “I’m having trouble,” stammered Eisenberg at the thought, “Just because of my own pessimism, picturing the thing that I’m worried I’m gonna make coming out after the logo that I have a lot of confidence in.”

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Study Set To Bring Antibody Treatments Right To Doors Of Long-Term Care Facilities – CBS Chicago

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CHICAGO (CBS) — When a person recovers from COVID-19, their body builds up antibodies that can then be used to help others fight the disease.

Now, one pharmaceutical company is using antibodies for treatment at long-term care facilities – by bringing it right to their doors.

As CBS 2’s Suzanne Le Mignot reported Monday, those in nursing homes are well-known to be among the most vulnerable to the coronavirus. At the Symphony South Shore and Symphony of Joliet nursing homes, there have been more than 30 COVID-19 deaths.

A total of 111 out of the 158 of the residents at the South Shore location tested positive for the virus in late April.

“In these outbreaks, staff have been infected as well as patients,” said Dr. Alexander Stemer, co-chair of the Symphony Health Network COVID-19 Task Force.

Dr. Alexander Stemer is the co-chair of the Symphony Health Network COVID-19 Task Force. Stemer has worked with the National Institutes of Health and Eli Lilly to create the protocol for a COVID-19 study, involving long-term care facilities.

Seven specially-equipped recreational vehicles are part of an on-site mobile infusion clinic.

“And these have all the equipment needed for a pharmacist to compound the infusion and to store it in a refrigerated setting,” Stemer said of the RVs.

The RVs will travel to nursing care facilities where there are outbreaks, across the United States. Those who may have been exposed to someone at a facility with the coronavirus will be given an infusion of antibodies.

“We would like to get the infusion started within a matter of days of the original exposure,” Stemer said.

A total of 2,400 people will take part in phase 3 of the study.

“They will be randomized so that half of the patients and half of the staff will receive the drug and half will receive placebo,” Stemer said, “and that is given as an infusion, which may take as long as two hours.”

Participants will receive the IV in infusion chairs. They will be followed for eight weeks afterward.

“We anticipate we will either prevent the infection or have a mild infection that will not result in terrible damage,” Stemer said.

Dr. Stemer said one of those specially-equipped RVs was on the way to California late Monday. The infusion chairs are brought into large dining areas in the RVs that are no longer in use for such purposes, so the areas can be used solely as an infusion center.

 

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RV, Boat Sales Spike Amidst Pandemic

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RV Solutions Vice President & General Manager Matt Leffingwell talks about RV...

Photo by Matthew Bowler

Above: RV Solutions Vice President & General Manager Matt Leffingwell talks about RV sales on July 31, 2020

The coronavirus pandemic has meant changes of all kinds in how we live our lives. That includes vacationing.

Lots of people don’t want to get on a plane, train or bus. That may be what’s behind a big increase in the sales of RVs and boats.

The Vice President and General Manager of RV Solutions in Kearny Mesa, Matt Leffingwell, has been in the RV business for 25 years. He said he’s never seen anything like this.

“We’ve literally had a wait as many as six people deep today, on a Friday. On the weekends, it can get pretty hectic,” Leffingwell said.

That scenario is playing itself out at RV dealerships across the country. Sales were already doing well. Figures from the RV Industry Association show a nearly 11% jump from June of last year. But they’ve really taken off since the pandemic hit.

“It’s not just the vacation, but even just traveling. (People are) going to go back and stay in New York for a month to visit family. They don’t want to fly. And how else do you do it?” said Leffingwell.

He said another indication the pandemic is behind the jump in sales is the fact that they are seeing a lot of first-time buyers. But whether it’s old hands or newbies, Leffingwell said the numbers are off the charts.

“Probably somewhere around 100, maybe 125%. Our inventory level right now is about a little less than half of what we would normally see,” he said.

It’s the same situation on the water over at Harbor Island. The business of boating is booming.

“Come May 1st, the second they opened up that bay, it was just phones ringing off the hook,” said Tom Bossenger, director of sales and marketing for California Yacht Sales. He said sales are riding on a wave of demand.

“It’s gotta be 200, maybe 300%. It’s significant,” Bossenger said.

“Right now, it really doesn’t matter whether it’s a $20,000 boat or a $200,000 boat. The second it comes on the market, we’ve just got five, six people calling the first day it’s on the market,” Bossenger said.

Whether it’s the big blue sea or the open road, getting away from it all in the age of COVID 19 has meant a bonanza for the folks that sell you what you need to get there.

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Lexington R-V School District moves school start date, cancels fall sports

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Lexington R-V School District moves school start date, cancels fall sports

Superintendent Sarrah Morgan says district will follow county Health Department’s recommendations


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AVERAGE. KELL THE JACKSON COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT IS MORNING O TWO COVID-19 OUTBREAKS. THERE ARE 30 CONFIRMED CASES FROM EXPOSURE AT OLD PATHS BAPTIST CHURCH. IT IS ESTIMATED MORE THAN 300 PEOPLE MAY HAVE BEEN EXPOSED. THERE ARE FIVE CONFIRMED CAS FROM –. FIVE MAY HAVE BEEN EXPOSED THERE. YOU ARE ASKED TO QUARANTINE IMMEDIATELY AND GET TESTED. WE’RE TRACKING THE CORONA VIRUS IMPACT ON BOTH SIDES OF THE STATE LINE. KANSAS IS REPORTING 942 NEW CASES SINCE WEDNESDAY. MISSOURI IS REPORTING 1400 NEW CASES SINCE THURSDAY THE CASES ARE FROM THE LAST 24 HOURS AS THE STATE HAS CAUGHT UP ON TEST RESULTS. KANSAS HAS A MORE THAN 18% POSITIVITY RATE. THE STATE DID CHANGE HOW IT IS REPORTING TESTING SO IT MAY BE ONE REASON THE NUMBER IS SO HIGH. MISSOURI IS AT ALMOST 11%. COVID-19 HAS BROUGHT MANY THINGS TO A HALT INCLUDING A LOT OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND DRUG TRIALS. BUT THERE’S AN EXCEPTION. ONE DRUG TRIAL GOT TO CONTINUE BECAUSE IT WAS DESIGNED TO B NO-CONTACT, COMPLETELY VIRTUAL. LOCAL DOCTORS BELIEVE THIS COULD BE THE FUTURE. >> I WOULD HAVE TO TAKE ABOUT THREE STEPS AND STOP AND CATC MY BREATH. KELLY: THAT’S 69-YEAR-OLD ANNA MEADOWS DESCRIBING WHAT IT’S LIKE TO LIVE WITH DIASTOLIC HEART FAILURE. THERE WAS NO TREATMENT THEN IN THE MIDDLE OF A PANDEMIC SHE WAS OFFERED THIS DRUG CALLED INVOKANA BEING STUDIED AS A TREATMENT FOR HER CONDITION. >> IF SOMEBODY’S BLOOD SUGAR GOES OVER A CERTAIN THRESHOLD, THEY WILL START TO URINATE SOME OF THEIR SUGARS. KELLY: DR. MICHALE NASSIF WITH SAINT LUKE’S MID AMERICA HEART INSTITUTE IS WORKING ON A STUDY CALLED THE CHIEF-HF TRIA ORIGINALLY DESIGNED TO TREAT DIABETES, INVOKANA HAD AN UNEXPECTED BENEFIT FOR PATIENTS WITH HEART FAILURE. MOST PATIENTS WHO QUALIFY ARE HIGH RISK FOR COVID-19. BUT WITH THIS STUDY THEY CAN DO EVERYTHING FROM HOME. ANNA RECEIVED A FIT BIT ALONG WITH THE DRUG. ALL HER INFORMATION IS FED DIRECTLY TO THE HOSPITAL. THE MEDICINE BOTTLE EVEN HAS A BLUE TOOTH CAP SO DOCTORS KNOW IT’S OPENED EVERYDAY. IT’S A DOUBLE BLIND STUDY BUT ANNA’S CONVINCED SHE’S GOT THE ACTUAL DRUG. >> I THINK I DO, BECAUSE I HAVE NOTICED SUCH A SIGNIFICANT CHANGE IN MY ABILITY TO BREATHE BETTER. >> IF THIS TRIAL WOR, PARTICULARLY FOR CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE, THIS WILL BE THE WAY FUTURE TRIALS GO. IT WILL BE SOME COMPONENT OF VIRTUAL OR 100% VIRTUAL. KELLY: DR. NASSIF SAYS THIS IS THE FIRST COMPLETELY VIRTUAL CLINICAL TRIAL TO SEEK FDA APPROVAL. AND HE SAYS THAT COULD HAPPEN YET THIS YEAR. IF YOU’RE INTERESTED IN THE STUDY, I HAVE A LINK TO MORE INFORMATION ON MY KMBC FACEBOOK PAGE COVID HAS MANY PARENTS CONCERNED AS STUDENTS RETURN TO SCHOOL CHILDREN’S MERCY HOSPITAL HAD A ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION EARLIER TODA DOCTORS EXPLAINED CHILDREN HAVE A SMALLER CHANCE OF CATCHING T VIRUS AND LESS SEVERE SYMPTOMS. CHILDREN’S MENTAL HEALTH WAS ALSO ADDRESSED WITH SEVERAL TECHNIQUES TO HELP THEM COPE. THE PUBLIC IS ALSO BEING ENCOURAGED TO HELP SCHOOLS BY LISTENING TO EXPERTS AND DOING THEIR PART >> WEARING MASKS SOMEHOW BECAME AN ISSUE OF A CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHT VERSUS DOING WHAT IS RIGHT. SCHOOL DISTRICTS CANNOT EXPECT TO DO IT ALL. KELL CHILDREN’S MERCY HOSPITAL HAS BACK TO SCHOOL GUIDELINES ON IT’S WEBSITE. JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY ALSO OFFERS A FREE ONLINE CONTACT TRACING COURSE. LATE ON, WE WILL HEAR WHAT THEY RECOMMEND TO UP YOUR CHILD’S MENTAL HEALTH. STUDENTS IN DE SOTO SAY THEY WANT TO BE BACK IN THE CLASSRO PHYSICALLY THIS FALL, NOT VIRTUALLY. THE DE SOTO DISTRICT PUSHED BA THE START DATE TO SEPTEMBER 8. STUDENTS HELD A RALLY AT THE HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL FIELD THI AFTERNOON TO LET THE BOARD KNOW THEY WANT CLASSES TO BE HELD IN PERSON THEY SAY, THEY ALSO WANT TO SEE SPORTS AND AFTER-SCHOO ACTIVITIES HAPPEN. >> I DONT WANT A MAJORITY OF STUDENTS, K-12 TO MISS OUT ON EDUCATION. BEING WITH THEIR FRIENDS, BEING WITH THE DIFFERENT ACTIVITIES THEY PARTICIPATE IN. I THINK THAT IS REALLY IMPORTANT FOR THEIR MENTAL HEALTH, GETTING OUT OF PHONES, IT IS JUST GOOD FOR STUDENTS TO BE IN SCHOOL AND IN ACTIVITIES. KELLY: THE SCHOOL BOARD PLANS TO SHARE THE OFFICIAL REVISED CALENDAR WITH FAMILIES ON TUESDAY. WHEN IT COMES TO BACK-TO-SCHOOL KMBC 9 NEWS HAS YOU COVERED. WE’LL LET YOU KNOW HOW DISTRICTS ARE OPENING FOR THE NEW YE PLUS THE LOCAL AND STATE DECISIONS THAT MIGHT AFFECT YOUR CHILD’S EDUCATION. LOOK FOR UPDATES ON-AIR AND AT KMBC.COM. PEOPLE IN JACKSON COUNTY, MISSOURI CAN GET TESTED FOR COVID-19. FREE TESTING CLINICS ARE SET FOR NEXT WEEK IN LEE’S SUMMIT. TIMES AND LOCATIONS ARE ON YOUR SCREEN NOW. ANY JACKSON COUNTIAN CAN GET TESTED EVEN IF THEY AREN’T SHOWING SYMPTOMS. YOU CAN REGISTER ON-LINE TO MAKE SURE YOU HAVE A SPOT IN LINE. TOP HEALTH OFFICIALS BACK ON CAPITOL HILL TODAY, TESTIFYING ABOUT THE U.S. RESPONSE TO CORONAVIRUS. THIS COMES AS THE NATION HIT ROUGHLY 4.5 MILLION CASES AND MORE THAN 152,000 DEATHS. BRIE JACKSON IS IN WASHINGTON, WHERE ADMINISTRATION OFFICIALS ARE BACK IN THE HOT SEAT REPORTER: TENSIONS RISING CAPITOL HILL AS PARTS OF THE U.S. FAIL TO CONTAIN COVID-19 OUTBREAKS LAWMAKERS NOW ASKING, WH >> THE ADMINISTRATION HAS FAILED ON TESTING. REPORTER DEMOCRATS ARGUE THE ADMINISTRATION’S RESPONSE IS TO BLAME, SOME REPUBLICANS COUNTERING, POINTING TO NATIONWIDE PROTESTS, CLAIMING DEMONSTRATORS AREN’T FOLLOWING GOVERNMENT GUIDELINES. >> YOU’VE OPINED ON A LOT OF THINGS DR. FAUCI THIS IS SOMETHING THAT DIRECTLY AFFECTS THE SPREAD OF THE VIRUS. REPORTER: OFFICIALS ADMIT DELAYED TESTING RESULTS ARE HURTING EFFORTS TO CONTACT TRACE. BUT THEY SAY FOR THE MOST PART POSITIVE PATIENTS ARE IDENTIFIED WITHIN FIVE DAYS >> I SURE THERE IS AN OUTLIER AT AM 12 TO 16 DAYS BECAUSE THA HAPPENS BUT THAT IS VERY ATYPICAL. REPORTER: FEDERAL LEADERS SAY ON AVERAGE THE U.S CONDUCTS NEARLY 820,000 TESTS PER DAY UP FROM 500,000 EARLIER THIS MONTH. RESEARCHERS ARE ALSO MAKING PROGRESS ON DEVELOPING A VACCINE BY THIS WINTER >> I BELIEVE IT IS A REALITY AND WILL BE SHOWN TO BE A REALITY. REPORTER: WHILE HEALTH OFFICIALS ARE CONFIDENT THEY’LL FIND A SAFE AND EFFECTIVE VACCINE THEY’RE STILL EXAMINING A DISTRIBUTION METHOD. THEY SAY THERE WILL LIKELY BE A PRIORITY LIST FOR ANY EARL VACCINES. BUT THE GOAL IS TO EVENTUALLY MAKE ONE WIDELY ACCESSIBLE >> WHEN A VACCINE BECOMES AVAILABLE,

Lexington R-V School District moves school start date, cancels fall sports

Superintendent Sarrah Morgan says district will follow county Health Department’s recommendations


The Lexington R-V School District has delayed the start of school until Sept. 14.In a note to families, Superintendent Sarrah Morgan said the school district would follow the guidance from the Lafayette County Health Department.In addition, the district said all sports would be discontinued for the fall semester, saying it would be “impossible to safely conduct these activities using COVID-19 prevention recommendations.””The trends for our area will be analyzed mid-October to determine if our rates are low enough to safely resume sporting activities,” Morgan said.The school district said it is working on adjusting the school calendar.

The Lexington R-V School District has delayed the start of school until Sept. 14.

In a note to families, Superintendent Sarrah Morgan said the school district would follow the guidance from the Lafayette County Health Department.

In addition, the district said all sports would be discontinued for the fall semester, saying it would be “impossible to safely conduct these activities using COVID-19 prevention recommendations.”

“The trends for our area will be analyzed mid-October to determine if our rates are low enough to safely resume sporting activities,” Morgan said.

The school district said it is working on adjusting the school calendar.

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N’West Iowa sees boost in RV sales | News

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REGIONAL—Owners of recreational vehicle dealerships in N’West Iowa have been happy campers lately.

Southwest Wholesale RV in Sheldon experienced slow sales early on this year because of the uncertainty the coronavirus pandemic brought, but that didn’t last long.

“About mid-April things drastically changed and we have been going full steam since,” said owner Mark Ten Clay, who has overseen the recreational vehicle dealership and service center with his wife, Carisa, for 20 years.



Southwest Wholesale RV in Sheldon

A trio of travel-trailer recreational vehicles sit near the entrance to Southwest Wholesale RV’s lot next to Highway 18 on the east side of Sheldon. The RV dealership has seen a high-than-usual level of interest this year from people wanting to buy camping vehicles, especially from first-time buyers.



He said interest in camping this year — as well as sales traffic and demand for camping vehicles — has been up this year, especially after Iowa campgrounds were given the all clear to open in early May.

“People want to get out and get away,” Ten Clay said. “Many have had to change plans this year. Camping gives people the flexibility to go where they want when they want.”

Southwest Wholesale RV, located at 90 North Runger Ave. along Highway 18, sells KZ and Venture brands of travel trailers and fifth wheels. Ten Clay said the business’ inventory is always changing but the aim is to keep a wide variety of new and used units on hand.

His business has seen more interest than usual this year from first-time RV buyers who are wanting to get into camping, which has further driven up demand.

“This year that has been challenging,” he said. “With the supply chain disrupted for several months, that pushed a lot of our incoming new inventory back. Used inventory has been hard to keep on the lot. Priced right, it moves quickly.”

Southwest Wholesale RV also has stayed busy this summer in its service department by preparing customers’ vehicles for the camping season.

“People that were not using their campers all that much now had limited options of recreation so now was the time to spruce up their unit or get it ready to go,” Ten Clay said.



Evan Wibben polishes RV in Sheldon

Eighteen-year-old Evan Wibben polishes the window of a Sportsmen recreational vehicle in Southwest Wholesale RV’s service center. In addition to selling new and used RVs, the Sheldon dealership offers a full range of maintenance and repair services.



The Sheldon dealership isn’t alone in seeing an uptick in N’West Iowans interested in RVs.

Ryan Zomer, co-owner of Zomer Rentals in Orange City, said the family-owned business has seen more people than usual looking into camping for the first time.

“The nice thing about it is if somebody does want to self-isolate and self-contain, you still can do it. You can make that possible with still getting a vacation,” Zomer said.

“I think that’s what’s really brought a lot of people to the forefront, and what better place for people to be than outside in the open air when there’s a virus going around?”

Zomer also pointed out the pandemic has meant more people have looked to spend vacations closer to home as opposed to traveling long distances, which makes camping a natural choice.

“Just staying local a little bit, not spending their money on flying and the trips to the other countries and whatnot and keeping it local and buying a camper instead,” Zomer said.

Zomer Rentals, located at 907 Eighth St. SW., has a fleet of about 30 RVs it rents out. It also sells used camping vehicles and provides camper repairs, winterizing and winter storage services.

The business sold RVs as far back as February this year and has kept busy with rentals as camping season got underway. Zomer said the season has been different from usual due to so many events having to be canceled, but what hasn’t changed is the desire for people to be outside.

“There definitely was a little bit of a drive there and got everybody thinking about it,” Zomer said.

“Who knows? Out of what happened, who knows how many more people it turns into normal campers?”



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Cancer patient raises funds for RV | Features

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Outside of trips to her cancer center, resident Jessica Buscho has been stuck in her home for nearly 140 days.

She’s now raising funds to secure an RV for travel to treatment appointments and hoping to spread the message of what mask wearing means to the silent population of the immune-compromised.

As a young mother of three who was diagnosed with Stage 4 colon cancer three years ago, COVID-19 has brought on a world of challenges and grief for those she’s lost. Since March, she reported losing a dozen friends who were also battling cancer, many of whom had stopped treatment during quarantine.

While society complains about the challenges of educating children from home, wearing masks or closed salons, Buscho finds herself worried about getting seen for treatments in Orange County — where she must go to continue a trial medication — without exposing herself to disease along the way.

“Our first trip down to Orange County, we booked a house and planned for two weeks of travel, but as soon as we started packing for the trip we realized how we needed to prepare for high-COVID areas like Orange County,” Buscho said.

To reduce the risk of her children coming in contact with the virus and bringing it back to her, she can’t leave them in the care of family. Thus the family of five must take the trip together. But that in itself came with challenges. They had to rent a Southern California home a week earlier than they needed it, which they hoped would offer safety against the virus even though it also offered an added cost. Bathroom breaks while on the road with kids became another issue.

The travel-weary family then decided to ask for help in purchasing an RV. With over $40,000, her GoFundMe page has already generated a near-goal response. Many of the contributions have come from her hometown in Sonoma County.

“Every single one of my high school teachers donated something … It’s so amazing,” she said of the support. “People have been incredibly generous.”

Buscho hopes to find a dealer who would be willing to sell the vehicle at or near cost.

She said her children have responded well to the frequent traveling — noting at first, they saw it as a vacation just to get out of the house.

“Sometimes it’s heartbreaking about how resilient they have to be,” she said. “But they power through.”

She said another heartbreak for her is the callousness with which some people are approaching the pandemic. For Buscho, whose husband and children are counting on her to survive, dismissive phrases such as “survival of the fittest” cut deep. And it’s for the sake of her family and those who are experiencing a similar struggle that she continues to be a voice of advocacy.

“The main thing is, the impact of COVID has gone so far beyond the people who are getting sick from COVID,” she said. “There’s this whole population of people who are being pushed aside and unable to leave their homes, and a lot of them are at the end stages of their life, so it’s a very isolating way to spend the last three months you have.”

In reaching out to friends who are staunchly opposed to wearing masks, she learned some of the opposition stems from the confusion around the messaging.

“The government is telling you to wear whatever you have, and that it’s better than nothing, but for someone who’s critical of the mask orders, it comes across as confusing,” she said. “It would be better to make really clear standards.”

But one of the most difficult aspects of COVID-19 for the cancer patient, she said, is going it alone to treatments. Her husband drives her to Southern California, but he isn’t allowed in the cancer center.

She described the moment she received difficult news regarding her treatment plan. She sat alone crying.

“My doctor said, ‘I want to hug you and I can’t, and I’m so sorry,’” Buscho recalled. “So I’m just going to cry, and you’re going to cry, and we’ll just cry together. Meanwhile, my husband is on video chat, and he’s just watching helplessly through the whole horrible interaction.”

Between the feeling of complete isolation and watching her friends die, Buscho urges the people who are opposed to wearing masks to reconsider their stance.

“For me masking is so important because if our community were to completely commit to masking, then it would mean we could reduce the transmission rate … and it would mean I could leave my home,” Buscho continued. “I’m part of an invisible population that you won’t see protesting and you won’t see crying in the streets because we can’t … We are all in our homes until the community gets behind us and decides to start wearing masks.”



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During a pandemic summer, Tanglewood Park is a popular spot for RVs

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FORSYTH COUNTY, N.C. — Summer vacationers are finding a cure for cabin fever by hitting the road in an RV. At Tanglewood Park RV Campground, their numbers are growing. Pam Vynalek is a park administrator at the Forsyth County park. She recalled a recent visit.

“A gentleman from Georgia bought a camper and he was our first stop. He was traveling, one of his children and grandchildren that lived here and then he was traveling on to see the others. He felt that was the safest way to visit his family,” Vynalek said.

During this pandemic summer, people want to vacation. But at the same time, they want to keep their distance. So families are turning to RVs and the numbers show it. Forysth County Marketing and Events Manager Brandi Chappell explained.

“There are a lot of campers in the United States and people want to live their life and continue to travel,” Chappell said.

The Tanglewood Park RV Campground opened in March. With the exception of April, every month has seen an increase over last year’s numbers. In the spring, Vynalek said Tanglewood was one of the few campgrounds that was welcoming visitors.

“When the pandemic hit, they had reservations across the country and the campgrounds were closed. So for a time, they had nowhere to go and we were the ones that were open,” Vynalek said.

Michael and Gloria Fry drove their RV from eastern North Carolina to Tanglewood. While they have family in the area, they are camping at Tanglewood to maintain social distance.

“We are not crowding the house up where they live. Plus they can come out here and whatever,” Michael Fry said.

Gloria prefers the natural beauty of Tanglewood while staying close to family.

“Tanglewood is so quiet. It’s peaceful. We have family in the area and we can do day visits from here,” she said.

The Fry family wishes they could keep the Tanglewood Park RV Campground a secret. Chappell said RV reservations are growing and will probably continue to go up.

“People in the RV community, they pass on that Tanglewood is a wonderful campground. We really don’t advertise that much about it,” Chappell said.

There are 44 RV campsites at Tanglewood. Most of them are booked during the Memorial Day holiday weekend and the Festival of Lights in December.

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Summer vacation plans stay the course in spite of COVID-19 spikes

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SUGGEST. REPORTER FOR GREG AND LISA PAXTON IT’S GOING TO BE A VERY SPECIAL TRIP. >> YOU NEVER KNOW WHEN IT COULD BE THE LAST. REPORTER: FAMILY HEALTH ISSU CONVINCING THEM TO TAKE THAT TOGETHER TRIP OF A LIFETIME BUT THEY DIDN’T WANT TO FLY SO THEY’RE CONSIDERING THIS. >> IT IS THE SAFEST OPTION BECAUSE FLYING TO ME IS NOT. REPORTER: ONE GUY WHOSE BECOME AN EXPERT AT SUMMER TRAVEL, MIKAH MEYER, HE’S VISITED ALL 419 NATIONAL PARKS. >> SOME OF THESE PARK SERVICE SITES ARE IN SUCH SMALL TOWNS, THAT YOU ARE BARELY AROUND ANYONE ELSE EVEN IN A PARKING LOT. REPORTER: HE SAYS THIS IS A GOOD YEAR TO HIT THE ROAD AND DISCOVER OUR COUNTRY. OPERATORS SAY RV RENTALS ARE UP 30 TO 40% RIGHT NOW WITH THIS COVID CRISIS. THEY SAY IT MIGHT BE THE SAFEST WAY TO TRAVEL THIS SUMMER FOR VACATION, BUT THEY OFFER ONE TIP, PLAN AHEAD. >> BACK TO BACK RESERVATIONS. REPORTER: JACQUELINE THON WITH WISE RENTALS AND MOVING IN LEES SUMMIT SAYS. >> IT’S IMPORTANT TO KIND A HAVE A GAME PLAN. HAVE DATES YOU WANT AND THE EARLIER THE BETTER WHEN IT COMES TO THE RESERVATIONS. REPORTER: AS FOR LISA AND GARY IT’S THEIR 20TH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY THIS SUMMER AND THEY SAY DESPITE EVERYTHING THAT’S HAPPENED THIS YEAR, THEY WANT THIS TRIP TO BE THE BEST AND SAFEST EVER.

Summer vacation plans stay the course in spite of COVID-19 spikes


Video above: RV rentals up as people look to vacation during COVID-19Not long ago, Lori Morell did something radical: She flew. On an airplane. All the way from her home in Grand Rapids, Michigan, to Reno, Nevada. It was time for her annual family vacation at the Mourelatos Lakeshore Resort in north Lake Tahoe, and she wasn’t going to miss it.”I’m going to live my life and nothing’s going to stop it unless it’s mandated,” says Morell, 42, who works within the Department of Justice and has been spending summers in Lake Tahoe since she was a toddler.Morell is not alone in her insistence on taking previously planned trips — or spontaneously deciding to hit the road — pandemic be damned.”Travel is part of the fabric of who we are,” says Lori Pennington-Gray, director of the Tourism Crisis Management Initiative at the Eric Freidheim Tourism Institute at the University of Florida, in Gainesville. “There’s this innate desire to travel and explore, and when we’re asked to stay home and not engage in that part of our life it becomes more evident how important it is to us.”Different people are traveling in different ways. Some are driving. Others are renting RVs. Still others, like Morell, are hopping on planes.And the question remains: why? Why are some people forging ahead with planned trips, despite the fact that the coronavirus is raging across the country?No one reasonThe answers vary. A survey commissioned by the American Hotel & Lodging Association found that 44% of Americans are planning overnight vacation or leisure travel in 2020. Of these, 55% are traveling for some kind of family event, such as a wedding, birthday, anniversary, or family reunion.That’s why Scott Gorenstein didn’t cancel his family vacation to Lincolnville Center, Maine, where he’s summered for more than 50 years. “It is collectively our favorite thing to do and place to go,” says Gorenstein, a media and talent executive with Sony Pictures Television, in New York. “It would be very disheartening to cancel and a blow to our psyche.”What’s more, his 80-year-old mother, who lives in Philadelphia, hasn’t gone anywhere since March. “She needs something to look forward to, and our annual trip is at the top of that list,” he said.For others, traveling is about ticking items off a bucket list, and they want to continue to do so. Alisha Brown, 46, and her husband, James, booked a two-week trip to Egypt with Osiris Tours for late October. “Our goal is to hit every continent,” says Brown, an accountant in Houston.It’s not that she doesn’t worry about getting sick. She does. But she’s been social distancing, wearing a mask and washing her hands diligently for the last few months.”We’ve been doing everything we needed to be safe,” she says. “But at some point we’re like, ‘we’re going to have to live with this.’ I have Purell wipes in my bag. I can wipe down things I feel uncomfortable with, like elevator buttons.”Since the only way to get to Egypt is by plane, Brown booked two seats on Emirates with extra legroom. She’s also planned private tours on the ground. “The only place where we’re with a number of people is on the four-day Nile cruise, but we have someone who meets us on the dock and takes us on our own tour,” she says.The family vacationsSome families are continuing with their trips because they don’t want to disappoint their kids, which is how Michelle and Tom Wild of Buffalo, New York, feel. Four years ago, the couple bought a 31-foot RV so they and their two sons could explore the country.”My husband makes a big PowerPoint presentation before we go. We look online and at books and on apps to find the coolest things to visit in every state,” says Wild, 38, assistant director of nursing at a hospital in Buffalo. “My kids live for this trip, more than anything else — even Disney! I didn’t want to take that away for them.”This year the family spent 13 days driving 3,734 miles down south and then back up the east coast, hitting eight states in the process. Many of them were COVID-19 hot spots, so they had to make a few adjustments, like vetoing Atlantic City because it didn’t seem safe. The bulk of their activities were outdoors, including a swamp boat tour in Louisiana and a visit to Wiener Works, in Fayetteville, North Carolina.They saw some friends and family, but slept in the RV, which has a kitchen and bunk beds. “I wasn’t nervous,” says Wild.Like the Wilds, most travelers prefer outdoor activities in somewhat remote locations. ToursByLocals, a tour marketplace that connects travelers with private tour guides, has seen a 128% increase from Americans looking to travel within the U.S. from May to June. Bookings in Yellowstone National Park are up 88% compared to the same period last year.Travelers are also choosing standalone units or retreats with little staff interaction. The Mohicans Treehouse Resort in Glenmont, Ohio, halfway between Cleveland and Columbus, is a private property on 77 acres with four ground cabins and nine treehouses. They’ve been booked three to four months out.”The self-isolation really started to get to people, they were getting severe cabin fever (pun intended) in their own homes and started craving a change of scenery,” says spokesperson Miguel DeJesus in an email. “We represent the next best and safest option: close to home, private and somewhat remote, no common areas, no interaction with staff, away from crowds, immersing in nature and the outdoors.”The great outdoorsThe adventure travel company Backroads has also been filling up, with popular hiking and cycling trips to Oregon’s Colombia River Gorge and Crater Lake, and Maine and Alaska.Sue Scaffidi, 50 and her husband, Matt, of Buffalo, returned from a June hiking trip with Backroads to the Blue Ridge Mountains, in North Carolina and the Great Smokey Mountains, in Tennessee. It was their fifth trip with the outfitter.”This is our anniversary gift to each other,” says Scaffidi, 50, who works in healthcare. “We’d been talking about where we want to go since November and booked the trip in early January. Then Covid hit and we were like, let’s see what happens.'”Although they had originally planned to fly, the couple decided to do the ten-and-a-half hour drive by car. Once they arrived at their hotel, she felt safe. Guides did temperature checks in the mornings, guests wore masks in the vans, and breakfast, lunch and snacks were laid out in advance, limiting physical contact.”You’re very self-contained, no one else is walking down your hallway and dinner is outside,” she says.Risks weighedAs for Morell, she, too, made sure she was going to be as safe as possible. She flew Delta, which is capping passengers and blocking middle seats through Sept. 30. They hand out sanitizer; all customers and crew members are required to wear face coveringsShe also spoke in advance with the owner of the resort, Alex Mourelatos, who told her about the safety precautions in place, which includes leaving a “rest” day between room cleanings; not having housekeeping during guest’s stay to limit person-to-person interaction; and leaving extra disinfectant in the rooms. While guests don’t have to wear masks on property, they are asked to socially distance.”I’m not worried,” she says. “I pray that I don’t get it, but I’m not going to live in fear. I’m not in a high-risk category and I’m going to social distance and wear my mask, but I’m also going to paddleboard. How much more socially distant can you get?”

Video above: RV rentals up as people look to vacation during COVID-19

Not long ago, Lori Morell did something radical: She flew. On an airplane. All the way from her home in Grand Rapids, Michigan, to Reno, Nevada. It was time for her annual family vacation at the Mourelatos Lakeshore Resort in north Lake Tahoe, and she wasn’t going to miss it.

“I’m going to live my life and nothing’s going to stop it unless it’s mandated,” says Morell, 42, who works within the Department of Justice and has been spending summers in Lake Tahoe since she was a toddler.

Morell is not alone in her insistence on taking previously planned trips — or spontaneously deciding to hit the road — pandemic be damned.

“Travel is part of the fabric of who we are,” says Lori Pennington-Gray, director of the Tourism Crisis Management Initiative at the Eric Freidheim Tourism Institute at the University of Florida, in Gainesville. “There’s this innate desire to travel and explore, and when we’re asked to stay home and not engage in that part of our life it becomes more evident how important it is to us.”

Different people are traveling in different ways. Some are driving. Others are renting RVs. Still others, like Morell, are hopping on planes.

And the question remains: why? Why are some people forging ahead with planned trips, despite the fact that the coronavirus is raging across the country?

No one reason

The answers vary. A survey commissioned by the American Hotel & Lodging Association found that 44% of Americans are planning overnight vacation or leisure travel in 2020. Of these, 55% are traveling for some kind of family event, such as a wedding, birthday, anniversary, or family reunion.

That’s why Scott Gorenstein didn’t cancel his family vacation to Lincolnville Center, Maine, where he’s summered for more than 50 years.

“It is collectively our favorite thing to do and place to go,” says Gorenstein, a media and talent executive with Sony Pictures Television, in New York. “It would be very disheartening to cancel and a blow to our psyche.”

What’s more, his 80-year-old mother, who lives in Philadelphia, hasn’t gone anywhere since March. “She needs something to look forward to, and our annual trip is at the top of that list,” he said.

For others, traveling is about ticking items off a bucket list, and they want to continue to do so. Alisha Brown, 46, and her husband, James, booked a two-week trip to Egypt with Osiris Tours for late October. “Our goal is to hit every continent,” says Brown, an accountant in Houston.

It’s not that she doesn’t worry about getting sick. She does. But she’s been social distancing, wearing a mask and washing her hands diligently for the last few months.

“We’ve been doing everything we needed to be safe,” she says. “But at some point we’re like, ‘we’re going to have to live with this.’ I have Purell wipes in my bag. I can wipe down things I feel uncomfortable with, like elevator buttons.”

Since the only way to get to Egypt is by plane, Brown booked two seats on Emirates with extra legroom. She’s also planned private tours on the ground. “The only place where we’re with a number of people is on the four-day Nile cruise, but we have someone who meets us on the dock and takes us on our own tour,” she says.

The family vacations

Some families are continuing with their trips because they don’t want to disappoint their kids, which is how Michelle and Tom Wild of Buffalo, New York, feel. Four years ago, the couple bought a 31-foot RV so they and their two sons could explore the country.

“My husband makes a big PowerPoint presentation before we go. We look online and at books and on apps to find the coolest things to visit in every state,” says Wild, 38, assistant director of nursing at a hospital in Buffalo. “My kids live for this trip, more than anything else — even Disney! I didn’t want to take that away for them.”

This year the family spent 13 days driving 3,734 miles down south and then back up the east coast, hitting eight states in the process. Many of them were COVID-19 hot spots, so they had to make a few adjustments, like vetoing Atlantic City because it didn’t seem safe. The bulk of their activities were outdoors, including a swamp boat tour in Louisiana and a visit to Wiener Works, in Fayetteville, North Carolina.

They saw some friends and family, but slept in the RV, which has a kitchen and bunk beds. “I wasn’t nervous,” says Wild.

Like the Wilds, most travelers prefer outdoor activities in somewhat remote locations. ToursByLocals, a tour marketplace that connects travelers with private tour guides, has seen a 128% increase from Americans looking to travel within the U.S. from May to June. Bookings in Yellowstone National Park are up 88% compared to the same period last year.

Travelers are also choosing standalone units or retreats with little staff interaction. The Mohicans Treehouse Resort in Glenmont, Ohio, halfway between Cleveland and Columbus, is a private property on 77 acres with four ground cabins and nine treehouses. They’ve been booked three to four months out.

“The self-isolation really started to get to people, they were getting severe cabin fever (pun intended) in their own homes and started craving a change of scenery,” says spokesperson Miguel DeJesus in an email. “We represent the next best and safest option: close to home, private and somewhat remote, no common areas, no interaction with staff, away from crowds, immersing in nature and the outdoors.”

The great outdoors

The adventure travel company Backroads has also been filling up, with popular hiking and cycling trips to Oregon’s Colombia River Gorge and Crater Lake, and Maine and Alaska.

Sue Scaffidi, 50 and her husband, Matt, of Buffalo, returned from a June hiking trip with Backroads to the Blue Ridge Mountains, in North Carolina and the Great Smokey Mountains, in Tennessee. It was their fifth trip with the outfitter.

“This is our anniversary gift to each other,” says Scaffidi, 50, who works in healthcare. “We’d been talking about where we want to go since November and booked the trip in early January. Then Covid hit and we were like, let’s see what happens.'”

Although they had originally planned to fly, the couple decided to do the ten-and-a-half hour drive by car. Once they arrived at their hotel, she felt safe. Guides did temperature checks in the mornings, guests wore masks in the vans, and breakfast, lunch and snacks were laid out in advance, limiting physical contact.

“You’re very self-contained, no one else is walking down your hallway and dinner is outside,” she says.

Risks weighed

As for Morell, she, too, made sure she was going to be as safe as possible. She flew Delta, which is capping passengers and blocking middle seats through Sept. 30. They hand out sanitizer; all customers and crew members are required to wear face coverings

She also spoke in advance with the owner of the resort, Alex Mourelatos, who told her about the safety precautions in place, which includes leaving a “rest” day between room cleanings; not having housekeeping during guest’s stay to limit person-to-person interaction; and leaving extra disinfectant in the rooms. While guests don’t have to wear masks on property, they are asked to socially distance.

“I’m not worried,” she says. “I pray that I don’t get it, but I’m not going to live in fear. I’m not in a high-risk category and I’m going to social distance and wear my mask, but I’m also going to paddleboard. How much more socially distant can you get?”

Lowest RV Rental Rates in Amercia!

Utah Vacation Rentals, Hotels at Exclusive Discounts! AirBNB!

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